Professor in Political Science and Computer and Information Science

David Lazer

Research Tracks Overview

Journal Article
Publication date: 
08/2015
Authors: 
Drew B. Margolin
Brian Keegan
Sasha Goodman
Yu-Ru Lin
David Lazer

The use of socio-technical data to predict elections is a growing research area. We argue that election prediction research suffers from under-specified theoretical models that do not properly distinguish between 'poll-like' and 'prediction market-like' mechanisms understand findings.

Keywords: 
election prediction
crowdsourcing
Wikipedia
politics
social media
communication studies
Journal Article
Publication date: 
07/2015
Authors: 
David Lazer
Anand E. Sokhey
Michael Neblo
Kevin M. Esterling
Ryan P. Kennedy

Do formal deliberative events influence larger patterns of political discussion and public opinion? Critics argue that only a tiny number of people can participate in any given gathering and that deliberation may not remedy - and may in fact exacerbate - inequalities. We assess these criticisms with an experimental design merging a formal deliberative session with data on participants' social networks.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
07/2015
Authors: 
David Lazer
Anand E. Sokhey
Michael Neblo
Kevin M. Esterling
Ryan P. Kennedy

Do formal deliberative events influence larger patterns of political discussion and public opinion? Critics argue that only a tiny number of people can participate in any given gathering and that deliberation may not remedy - and may in fact exacerbate - inequalities. We assess these criticisms with an experimental design merging a formal deliberative session with data on participants' social networks.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
06/2015
Authors: 
Yu-Ru Lin
Drew B. Margolin
David Lazer

The increasing abundance of digital textual archives provides an opportunity for understanding human social systems. Yet the literature has not adequately considered the disparate social processes by which texts are produced.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
06/2015
Authors: 
Yu-Ru Lin
Drew B. Margolin
David Lazer

The increasing abundance of digital textual archives provides an opportunity for understanding human social systems. Yet the literature has not adequately considered the disparate social processes by which texts are produced.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
05/2015
Authors: 
David Lazer

Humanity is in the early stages of the rise of social algorithms: programs that size us up, evaluate what we want, and provide a customized experience. This quiet but epic paradigm shift is fraught with social and policy implications. The evolution of Google exemplifies this shift.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
05/2015
Authors: 
Jameson L. Toole
Yu-Ru Lin
Erich Muehlegger
Daniel Shoag
Marta C Gonzalez
David Lazer

Can data from mobile phones be used to observe economic shocks and their consequences at multiple scales? Here we present novel methods to detect mass layoffs, identify individuals affected by them and predict changes in aggregate unemployment rates using call detail records (CDRs) from mobile phones.

Keywords: 
unemployment
computational social science
social networks
mobility
complex systems
Journal Article
Publication date: 
04/2015
Authors: 
Jesse Shore
Ethan Bernstein
David Lazer

Using data from a novel laboratory experiment on complex problem solving in which we varied the structure of 16-person networks, we investigate how an organization's network structure shapes the performance of problem-solving tasks. Problem solving, we argue, involves both exploration for information and exploration for solutions.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
04/2015
Authors: 
Ryan P. Kennedy
Brian Keegan
Eric Forbush
David Lazer

This article advocates a lesson plan for introductory comparative politics and election courses. The authors argue that Wikipedia (yes, Wikipedia) provides a unique platform for improving learning outcomes and a useful social good from traditional student papers on elections.

Journal Article
Publication date: 
04/2015
Authors: 
Ryan P. Kennedy
Brian Keegan
Eric Forbush
David Lazer

This article advocates a lesson plan for introductory comparative politics and elections courses. The authors argue that Wikipedia (yes, Wikipedia) provides a unique platform for improving learning outcomes and a useful social good from traditional student papers on elections.

Pages